David Bohm: Causality and Chance, Letters to Three Women

David Bohm: Causality and Chance, Letters to Three Women (2017)

The letters transcribed in this book were written by physicist David Bohm to three close female acquaintances in the period 1950 to 1956. They provide a background to his causal interpretation of quantum mechanics and the Marxist philosophy that inspired his scientific work in quantum theory, probability and statistical mechanics. In his letters, Bohm reveals the ideas that led to his ground breaking book Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. The political arguments as well as the acute personal problems contained in these letters help to give a rounded, human picture of this leading scientist and twentieth century thinker.

See the publisher’s page about this book here.

A New Book About David Bohm and Jiddu Krishnamurti’s Collaboration

David Moody has released the book An Uncommon Collaboration: David Bohm and J. Krishnamurti.  This book is currently available on Amazon.

For more than two decades, renowned theoretical physicist David Bohm engaged in a close collaboration with psychological philosopher J. Krishnamurti. The two men participated together in 144 recorded dialogues and many unrecorded conversations, and the transcripts of their discussions appear in several published volumes. Their mutual interests encompassed the whole of human consciousness, its nature and structure, and the sources of illusion and conflict in the individual and in society. An Uncommon Collaboration: David Bohm and J. Krishnamurti describes the course of their relationship from beginning to end, including the substance of their dialogues as well as the uneven quality of their personal interactions. Author David Edmund Moody worked with both men for more than a decade, and his observations of them inform and supplement his description of their relationship. Bohm’s background as a physicist was characterized by his close associations with Oppenheimer and Einstein, his revolutionary contributions to the foundations of quantum mechanics, and his clash with the House Committee on UnAmerican Activities, an event which ultimately deprived him of his American citizenship. Krishnamurti’s background was notable for his break with the Theosophical Society, which had nurtured him as a youth and hailed him as the World Teacher. He developed his own independent philosophy, one which offered penetrating insights into the human condition and emphasized freedom from all authority in psychological and religious matters. An Uncommon Collaboration: David Bohm and J. Krishnamurti describes the life stories of the two men individually as well as the nature and quality of their relationship. The book concludes with a critical assessment of each man’s contribution to the work they were engaged in, their mutual accomplishments, and the issues that remain unresolved. Moody’s work with Bohm featured several recorded dialogues that examined Bohm’s views on Krishnamurti’s philosophy and his personality. Complete transcripts of these conversations provide a rich, illuminating supplement to the text.